Colonel Devereux's Regiment - Articles and Features

Of Swine Feathers by Charles Singleton
Whilst garrisoning the city of Gloucester, several regiments had Swedish Feathers issues to them. Amongst those receiving them, were the musketeers of Col. Edward Massey’s and Col. Nicholas Devereux’s regiments. Both regiments, were to supply large contingents of musketeers for service with Wallers army on several occasions including Cropredy Bridge and took part in Massey’s aggressive raiding along the Welsh Marches, the Forest of Dean and into the West Country. more....

A short piece on favours by Charles Singleton With reference to Stuart Peachey’s work on Soldiers clothing
Favours, like scarves, were used during the Civil Wars to denote allegiance. Their primary purpose, however was to indicate which company within the regiment the soldier belonged too.  Midland’s recruits for the First Bishops War, were issued “one yard of ribbon per man, at 5d a yard’. Those troops sent by Parliament to fight in the support of Hull in 1642 were described as sporting red and yellow ribbons in their hats. Parliamentarian troops based in Dorset were issued with ribbons made of sarsnet fabric. more....

A guide to the use of muskets during the English Civil War. By Simon Frame
The matchlock muskets bought for the New Model Army (generally known as ‘the Army Under Sir Thomas Fairfax’) which ordered 16250 matchlock muskets ‘full bore & proofe’ were purchased at an average cost of 10s, although some cost up to 11s 6d.  Early orders for all musket types say ‘English’, which was dropped by the mass December orders. Perhaps English manufacturers couldn’t keep up with demand?  Interestingly, the 5150 ordered on 22nd December 1645 are specifically ‘4 foot long full bore and proofe’, suggesting 48” barrels were still used, rather than the 42” which we accept as the norm for later in the war. The matchlock musket weighed about 11-12 lbs. more....

A History of Devereux’s Regiment by Alan Turton                                                                  
Nicholas Devereux was a member of an ancient Anglo-Irish branch of the famous mainland Devereux family and claimed he was the only male of that branch not ‘tainted’ by Catholicism.  In the Irish rebellion of 1641 he appears to have served in the Government Army, possibly commanding local native levies.  Eventually he fled to England with his wife, Bridget, and their young children, leaving behind an estate devastated by the rebellion. more....

The Malmesbury Garrison Accounts
THIS is an edition of two manuscript account books of the Parliamentary garrisons of Chalfield‘ and Malmesbury during a part of the
Civil War. Both documents are now in the Public Record Office where their official description is “State Papers, Domestic, Commonwealth Exchequer Papers (S.P.28), No. 138. Part 1 (Chalfield), Part 2 (Malmesbury). Part 1 more....

Is That Actually An English Civil War ‘Lobster Pot Helmet’ ? Stephen Ede-Borrett

We have all, I am sure, been there – the Country House, the Castle or the Museum – and seen, or had pointed out to us, the ‘Lobster Tail Helmet’ (hereinafter just simply helmets, or this blog is going to get very tedious) “from the English Civil War”, or worn by some member of the family “whilst serving under Prince Rupert / Oliver Cromwell” more....